In the state of Florida, the sentence for the crime of driving with a suspended license, cancelled license, or revoked license, depends upon whether the offense is the first, second, or third offense. A first offense is penalized as a second-degree misdemeanor. Under Florida law, a second degree misdemeanor is punishable by jail time of up to 60 days. A second degree misdemeanor is also punishable by a fine, of up to five hundred dollars ($500.00). 

To obtain a conviction, the prosecution must prove that the person knew the license was suspended, cancelled, or revoked, at the time the person was driving. Drivers typically are given notice of license suspension or revocation by mail from the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles.

A second offense of driving with a suspended, cancelled, or revoked license is punishable as a first-degree misdemeanor. A first degree misdemeanor is punishable by up to a year in jail. A first degree misdemeanor is also punishable by a fine, of up to one thousand dollars ($1,000). To obtain a conviction, the prosecution must prove that the person knew the license was suspended, cancelled, or revoked, at the time the person was driving. 

A third conviction for the offense of driving with a suspended, cancelled, or revoked license constitutes a third degree felony. A third degree felony is punishable by up to five years in prison, and a fine of up to five thousand dollars ($5,000). To obtain a conviction, the prosecution must prove that the person knew the license was suspended, cancelled, or revoked, at the time the person was driving. 

How Do You Know How Many Points are On Your License in Florida?

Florida assigns “points” to specific traffic law violations. Individuals who receive a certain number of points within a given time frame are subject to license suspension. The Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles’ website provides information on the point values assigned to specific traffic offenses.

An individual may determine the number of points on their license by calling their local driver’s license office. The office, upon the person’s giving their driver’s license number, will provide the number of points. 

How Many Points Lead to a Suspended Drivers License in Florida?

In Florida, accumulating 12 points within 12 months results in a 30-day suspension. Accumulating 18 points within 18 months results in a three-month suspension. Accumulating 24 points within 36 months results in a one-year suspension. 

What Can Result in Points On My Drivers License in Florida?

Some traffic offenses and their associated point values are are as follows:

  • Reckless driving: 4 points;
  • Motor vehicle crash in which an individual leaves the scene: 6 points;
  • Careless driving: 3 points; and
  • Speeding: 3 points. 

Multiple infractions of the same law result in point values accumulating. For example, a speeding ticket carries a point value of 3 points. 2 speeding tickets, therefore, carry a value of 6 points.

How Can I Reduce the Points On My Drivers License in Florida?

Individuals who attend and complete a basic driver improvement class are eligible for point reduction. Individuals must register for classes, pay any required class fees, and present a certificate of class completion to the state. 

How Do I Know If My Drivers License is Suspended in Florida?

Florida drivers are given notice of license suspension or revocation by mail from the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles. If the notice is not given notice of, or does not otherwise know of the suspension, the person may assert lack of knowledge as a defense. 

Do I Need a Lawyer If My Drivers License was Suspended in Florida?

Observing Florida motor vehicle laws and attending to financial obligations, such as child support payment, is the best way to ensure your license does not get suspended. Under Florida law, a valid suspension of a driver’s license results in loss of driving privileges. If your license has been suspended, you should contact a Florida criminal law attorney

An attorney can assist you with obtaining a hardship license or license reinstatement. If you are charged with driving with a suspended license, you should contact a Florida criminal law attorney. An experienced criminal defense attorney can explain your rights and options, and can represent you in court.