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DUI Driver's License Suspension Lawyers

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What Happens to My License If I Am Convicted of Drunk Driving?

Depending on the law in each state, a drunk driver's license can be suspended or revoked for a DWI/DUI conviction. If a license is revoked, there is no guarantee that a driver will have his license reinstated at the end of the revocation period. The length of time that the license is suspended or revoked for following a DUI conviction varies from state to state:  

Arizona

  • First offense: Suspended for 90 to 360 days.
  • Second offense or more: Suspended for a year.

California

  • First offense: Suspended for 6 months.
  • Second offense: Suspended for 2 years.
  • Third offense: Revoked for 3 years.
  • Fourth offense: Revoked for 4 years.

Florida

  • First offense: Revoked from 180 days to 1 year, eligible for a hardship license before revocation period ends.
  • Second offense within 5 Years: Revoked for minimum of 5 years, eligible for a hardship license after 1 year.
  • Third offense within 10 Years: Revoked for minimum of 10 years, eligible for a hardship license after 2 years.
  • Four or more offenses: Permanent revocation.

Georgia

  • First offense, age 15 or under: Suspended until age 17.
  • First offense, age 16 to 20: Suspended for six months.
  • First offense, age 21 or older: Suspended for 120 days.
  • Second offense, age 15 or under: Suspended until age 18.
  • Second offense, age 16 to 20: Suspended for 12 months.
  • Second offense, age 21 or older: Suspended 18 months.
  • More than 2 offenses, age 21 or older: Permanent revocation with a possibility of permit license after 2 years of revocation. 

Illinois

  • First offense: Revoked for minimum of 1 year.
  • Second offense within 20 years: Revoked for minimum of 3 years.
  • Third offense: Revoked for minimum of 6 years.
  • Four or more offenses: Permanent revocation.

Kentucky

  • First offense: Suspended for 30 to 120 days.
  • Second offense: Suspended for 12 to 18 months.
  • Third offense: Suspended for 24 to 36 months.
  • Fourth offense: Suspended for 60 months.

Massachusetts

  • First offense: Suspended for a year.
  • Second offense: Suspended for two years.
  • Third offense: Suspended for eight years. Considered a felony, which carries harsher penalties, such as jail time.
  • Fourth offense: Suspended for ten years. Considered a felony, which carries harsher penalties, such as jail time.
  • Five or more offenses: Permanent license revocation. Considered a felony, which carries harsher penalties, such as jail time.

Michigan

  • First offense: Suspended for a year, eligible for a license with restrictions including having an Ignition Interlock Device installed to the dashboard of all vehicles offender owns.
  • Second offense: Suspended for a year without possibility of license renewal. Suspension can be extended to five years if a prior DUI is on record within the last seven years.
  • Third offense: License revocation for at least five years. Vehicle immobilization for one to three years.

Nevada

  • First offense: Suspended for 90 days, with restricted license renewal possible after half of suspension served (45 days).
  • Second offense: Suspended for one year, without possibility of restricted license.
  • Third offense: Suspended for three years, with restricted license renewal possible but on condition of an Ignition Interlock Device installed to the dashboard of all vehicles offender owns.

New York

DUI conviction:

  • First offense: Revoked for minimum 6 months.
  • Second offense within 10 years: Revoked for minimum 1 year.
  • Third offense within 10 years: Revoked for minimum 1 year.

DWAI (Driving with Ability Impaired) conviction:

  • First offense: Suspended for 90 days.
  • Second offense within 5 years: Revoked for minimum 6 months.
  • Third offense within 10 years: Revoked for minimum 6 months.

Oregon

  • First offense: Suspended for a year.
  • Second offense: If within 5 years of previous conviction, suspended for three years.
  • Third offense: Permanent revocation.

Texas

  • First offense: Suspended from 90 days to 1 year, eligible for an occupational driver's license with restricted driving privileges.
  • Two or more offenses within 10 years: Suspended for 1 year.

Utah

  • First offense, under age 21: Suspended for 4 months or until offender reaches age of 21, whichever is longer.
  • First offense, over age 21:  Suspended for 4 months.
  • Second offense, under 21: Suspended for 2 years or until 21, whichever is longer.
  • Second offense, over age 21: Suspended for 2 years.

Vermont

  • First offense: Suspended 90 days.
  • Second offense: Suspended for 18 months.
  • Third offense: Permanent license revocation, although offender may appeal the revocation after three years provided that he or she has abstained from consumption of alcohol or drugs.

Washington

  • First offense: Suspended for 90 Days.
  • Second offense: Suspended for 2 years.
  • Third offense: Suspended for 3 years. Suspended for 4 years if blood alcohol level is .15 or above.

Wisconsin

  • First offense: Suspended for six to nine months.
  • Second offense: Suspended for 12 to 18 months.
  • Third or more offenses: Suspended for 2 to 3 years. Occupational license for work can be applied for 90 days after suspension begins. Occupational license expires after a year.

Are There Other Possible Penalties?

Yes. Administrative License Revocation or Suspension (ALR/ALS) laws passed in most states permit an arresting officer to seize the license of drivers who fail or refuse to take a breath test. Under these laws the license is automatically revoked or suspended before the driver is convicted of drunk driving. This administrative penalty is completely separate from any criminal penalties the driver may face.

Those convicted of a DUI can face other consequences, ranging from community service and fines to jail time. States can also require that an Ignition Interlock Device, a device which requires the driver to take a breath test before starting the engine and locks the car if the device detects alcohol, be installed on all vehicles owned. Many states also count multiple offenses as a felony, which may impede the offender from finding employment when background checks are conducted.

What Should I Do If I Am Arrested for Drunk Driving DUI/DWI?

If you are arrested for Drunk Driving DUI/DWI, you should speak to an experienced criminal defense lawyer immediately to learn more about your rights, your defenses, and the complicated legal system.

Victims of Drunk Driving Accidents

If you are a victim of a Drunk Driving DUI/DWI accident, you should speak to a lawyer immediately to learn how to get compensation for your injuries.

Photo of page author Ken LaMance

, LegalMatch Law Library Managing Editor and Attorney at Law

Last Modified: 09-30-2016 02:38 PM PDT

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