Suspension of Deportation

Where You Need a Lawyer:

(This may not be the same place you live)

At No Cost! 

 What Is Suspension of Deportation?

Removal or deportation, is the process of removing a foreign individual from a country for violating immigration regulations. Immigration officials perform this procedure, determining if a person is entitled to stay in the nation and, if not, remove the individual from the country.

The typical removal process starts when the person receives a Notice to Appear (NTA) before an immigration court. The NTA explains the reasons for removal, and the subject must appear before a court to evaluate their status to stay in the nation. The person is given a chance to offer facts and testimony to support their case during the hearing. The immigration court then makes the ultimate decision on whether the person will be deported. If the court orders removal, the person may file an appeal with the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA).

With the enactment of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRIRA) in 1996, the word “deportation” was replaced with the term “removal.” This modification was made to reflect the broader scope of the removal procedure, which now includes those who have never been lawfully admitted to the nation and people who have overstayed their visas or committed crimes while in the country. The phrase “removal” embraces a broader spectrum of persons and situations, reflecting the process more accurately.

Suspension of Deportation is one kind of respite from deportation. Individuals who are in the process of being removed from the nation but can establish that their removal would cause great hardship to themselves or their family members who are U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents are eligible for this relief. To be eligible for deportation relief, a person must have been physically present in the United States for at least seven years and demonstrate good moral character. The person must also establish that their removal would cause much more difficulty than that experienced by others in comparable situations.

In conclusion, removal or deportation refers to removing a foreign individual from a country for violating immigration regulations. The word “deportation” was replaced with “removal” to reflect the broader scope of the procedure, which now includes those who have never been lawfully admitted to the nation and those who have overstayed their visas or committed crimes.

Suspension of Deportation is a relief from removal given to those who may show that their deportation would cause great hardship to themselves or their family members who are U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents.

When Can Suspension of Deportation Be Put into Effect?

Suspension of Deportation is a relief from deportation that may be implemented when a foreign citizen is about to be deported from the United States. Individuals who may establish that their removal would cause great hardship to themselves or their family members who are US citizens or legal permanent residents are eligible for this relief.

In general, relief from deportation refers to the different types of protection offered to anyone facing deportation from the United States. Asylum, deferral of removal, modification of status, and cancellation of removal are all types of protection. The qualifying criteria and precise kinds of relief available to a person are determined by various variables, including the individual’s immigration history, grounds for removal, and links to the United States.

To be eligible for deportation relief, a person must have been physically present in the United States for at least seven years and demonstrate good moral character. The person must also establish that their removal would cause much more difficulty than that experienced by others in comparable situations. This kind of relief may be complicated and requires a detailed grasp of immigration law and the numerous types of relief available.

Individuals facing deportation should seek the advice of an immigration attorney to help them through the process and understand their possibilities for relief.

What Is Cancellation of Removal?

Cancellation of Removal is a kind of deportation remedy offered to certain non-permanent residents of the United States who are facing removal proceedings.

Unlike deportation suspension, which is only accessible to those who can establish that their removal would cause great hardship to themselves or their family members who are US citizens or legal permanent residents, cancellation of removal is open to a broader spectrum of people.

To be eligible for cancellation of removal, a person must have been physically present in the United States for a certain time, often at least ten years, and be of good moral character throughout that time. Furthermore, the applicant must demonstrate that their deportation would cause extraordinary and highly unusual hardship to their US citizen or legal permanent resident spouse, parent, or kid.

Generally, the qualifying conditions for cancellation of removal are less stringent than those for suspension of deportation. However, the number of people who may be given the cancellation of removal is limited each year. Even if a person meets the qualifying standards, there is no certainty that they will be granted this kind of relief.

Because they already have legitimate immigration status in the United States, lawful permanent residents, commonly known as green card holders, are normally ineligible for cancellation of removal. If a legal permanent resident is facing deportation because of certain criminal convictions or other immigration infractions, they may be entitled to various types of remedies, such as a waiver of inadmissibility.

In conclusion, Cancellation of Removal is a kind of relief from deportation offered to some non-permanent residents of the United States who are facing deportation proceedings. This kind of relief is often more forgiving than deportation suspension, but the number of people who may be given the cancellation of removal each year is restricted. Ordinarily, lawful permanent residents are not eligible for cancellation of removal, although they may be entitled to other types of relief.

Do I Need an Immigration Lawyer for Help with Removal or Deportation Issues?

If you or a loved one is facing deportation or removal proceedings, it is highly advised that you seek the advice of an experienced immigration attorney. An immigration attorney can explain your rights and choices to you and give counsel and assistance during the removal process.

An immigration lawyer may also assist you in preparing and presenting a solid case for relief from removals, such as deportation suspension or cancellation, and can defend you in court. They can also help you with any appeals and negotiate the complicated and sometimes confusing immigration procedure.

Furthermore, an immigration lawyer may assist you in understanding the possible repercussions of removal or deportation, such as the effect on your future ability to rejoin the United States and the possibility of separation from family members who are U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents. They may also assist you in preparing for the possible implications of removal and advise you on how to defend your rights and interests effectively.

It is important to realize that immigration rules and processes may be complicated and ever-changing and that the result of your case can have significant and long-term effects. You can guarantee that your case is handled correctly and that your rights are protected throughout the process by dealing with an immigration lawyer.

Use LegalMatch to find the right lawyer for your case today.

star-badge.png

16 people have successfully posted their cases

Find a Lawyer