Peeping is defined as knowingly entering a victim’s premises or property with the intent to peep, peer, or spy through their window, door, or other opening of a structure. The property or premises may be owned, leased, or rented by the victim or another individual. The defendant conceals themselves in order to spy on the victim.

What Is the Crime of Peeping While in Possession of a Deadly Weapon in Nevada?

This crime refers to knowingly entering on the property of another with the intent to peep, spy, or peer in a window, door, or other opening in the structure. The person is accused of peering into the premises while having a deadly weapon such as a knife or gun.

What If the Person Was in Possession of a Device That Can Record Images?

The person is still guilty of a crime that is more serious than standard peeping. A person is accused of peering into a property and looking at the victim while in possession of:

  • Digital camera
  • Photographic camera
  • Video recording device

What Is the Penalty for Peeping in Nevada?

The penalty depends on the severity of the case. The least serious is the misdemeanor because a person is accused of peeping by itself. The penalty is:

  • Six months in county jail
  • $1,000 fine
  • Fine and jail time

If a person is convicted of peeping with a deadly weapon, the crime is a category B felony punishable by:

  • One to six years in prison
  • $5,000 fine
  • Fine and prison time

If a person is convicted of peeping with a device, it is a gross misdemeanor for a first offense. This crime is punishable by:

  • One year in county jail
  • $2,000 fine
  • Fine and jail time

If the person has already been convicted of peeping with a device at least one time prior, then any subsequent conviction is a category E felony. This category of felony is punishable by:

  • One to four years in prison
  • $5,000 fine
  • Both a fine and time in prison

Do I Need an Attorney?

Having legal representation is crucial if you do not want to end up in jail for a long time over a peeping charge. Contact a Nevada attorney immediately for help with your criminal charge.