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Personal Injury Statute of Limitations by State

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Personal Injury Statute of Limitations by State

Statute of limitations are deadlines for filing a lawsuit. In the context of a personal injury case, you must file a lawsuit within a specified time after an injury occurs. If you are injured and wait too long to file a legal claim, you may never be able to bring a lawsuit to recover for your injuries.

The period of time during which the plaintiff can file the lawsuit vary depending on the type of claim and the state the plaintiff is filing the lawsuit.

What Are Tolling Periods?

Sometimes the statute of limitation is "tolled" for a period of time. When the time period is tolled it means that the time period is on hold and is not running until the toll period ends. This gives plaintiffs extra time to file the lawsuit.

For example, the statute of limitation does not begin to run if the defendant is a minor, is insane, or is in prison. When the reason for the tolling ends, the statute of limitation begins to run again.

Each state has a different Statute of limitation, or time period within which to file a personal injury lawsuit. The following are the statutes that apply to each state:

STATE LIMITATION STATUTES

  • Alabama - 2 years Title 6, Ch. 2, 6-2-38
  • Alaska Statute of Limitations - 2 years Sec. 9.10.070
  • Arizona Statute of Limitations - 2 years Title 12, Article 3, Sec. 12-542
  • Arkansas Statute of Limitations - 3 years (libel, wrongful death), 2 years med malpractice; 1 year slander Secs. 16-56-104, 16-56-105, 16-114-203, 16-62-102
  • California Statute of Limitations - 2 years for intentional torts; 1 year for slander, libel Code of Civ. Proc. Sec. 335.1, 340
  • Colorado Statute of Limitations - 2 years Colo. Rev. Stat. Sec. 13-80-102
  • Connecticut Statute of Limitations - 2 years Conn. Gen. State. Sec. 52-584
  • Delaware Statute of Limitations - 2 years Title 10, Ch. 81, Sec. 8119
  • DC Statute of Limitations - 3 years Title 12, Ch. 3, Sec. 12-301
  • Florida Statute of Limitations - 4 years Title 8, Ch. 95, Sec. 95.11
  • Georgia Statute of Limitations - 2 years Sec. 9-3-33
  • Hawaii  - 2 years Rev. Stat. Sec. 657.7
  • Idaho Statute of Limitations - 2 years Title 5, Ch. 2, Sec. 5-219
  • Illinois Statute of Limitations - 2 years Ch. 735, Act 5, Art 13, Sec. 13-202
  • Indiana Statute of Limitations - 2 years Title 34, Art. 11, Ch. 2, Sec. 34-11-2-4
  • Iowa Statute of Limitations - 2 years Chapter 614, Section 614.1
  • Kansas Statute of Limitations - 2 years Chapter 60, Art 5, Sec. 60-513
  • Kentucky Statute of Limitations - 1 year Title 36, Chapter 413, Sec. 413.140
  • Louisiana Statute of Limitations - 1 year Ci. Code. Art. 3492
  • Maine Statute of Limitations - 6 years Title 14,Part 2, Ch. 205, Sub. 1, Sec. 752
  • Maryland Statute of Limitations - 3 years Courts and Judicial Proceedings, Sec. 5-101
  • Massachusetts Statute of Limitations - 3 years Title 5, Ch. 260, Secs. 2A and 4
  • Michigan Statute of Limitations - 3 years Chapter 600, Act 236, Ch. 58, Sec. 600.5805, number 9
  • Minnesota Statute of Limitations - 2 years Ch. 541, Sec 541.05, 541.07
  • Mississippi Statute of Limitations - 3 years Title 15, Ch. 1, Sec. 15-1-49
  • Missouri Statute of Limitations - 5 years Title 35, Ch. 516, Sec. 516.120
  • Montana Statute of Limitations - 3 years Title 27, Ch. 2, 27-2-204 and 27-2-207
  • Nebraska Statute of Limitations - 4 years Title 25, Section 207, 25-207
  • Nevada Statute of Limitations - 2 years Chapter 11, Sec 11.190
  • New Hampshire Statute of Limitations - 3 years Chapter 508, Sec. 508.4
  • New Jersey Statute of Limitations - 2 years Title 2A, Ch. 14, Sec. 2A:14-2
  • New Mexico Statute of Limitations - 3 years Ch. 37, Art. 1, Sec. 37-1-8
  • New York Statute of Limitations - 3 years Civil Practice Laws and Rules, Art. 2, Sec. 214
  • N. Carolina Statute of Limitations - 3 years Title 1, Section 1-52
  • N. Dakota Statute of Limitations - 6 years; 2 years in wrongful death Title 28, Ch. 1, Secs. 28-01-16 and 28-01-18
  • Ohio Statute of Limitations - 2 years Title 23, Ch. 5, Sec. 2305.10
  • Oklahoma Statute of Limitations - 2 years Title 12, Ch. 3, Sec. 95
  • Oregon Statute of Limitations - 2 years Ch. 12, Sec. 12.110
  • Pennsylvania Statute of Limitations - 2 years 42 PA Con. Stat. Section 5524
  • Rhode Island Statute of Limitations - 3 years Title 9, Ch. 1, Sec. 9-1-14
  • S. Carolina Statute of Limitations - 3 years Title 15, Ch. 3, Sec. 15-3-530
  • S. Dakota Statute of Limitations - 3 years Title 15, Ch. 2, Sec. 15-2-14
  • Tennessee Statute of Limitations - 1 year Title 28, Ch. 3, Sec. 28-3-104
  • Texas Statute of Limitations - 2 years Civ. Prac. & Rem Code, Title 2, Ch. 16, Sec. 16.003
  • Utah Statute of Limitations - 4 years Title 78, Ch. 12, Sec. 78-12-25
  • Vermont Statute of Limitations - 3 years Title 12, Part 2, Ch. 23, Subch. 2, Sec. 512
  • Virginia Statute of Limitations - 2 years Title 8.01, Ch. 4, Sec. 8.01-243
  • Washington Statute of Limitations - 3 years Title 4, Ch. 16, Sec. 4.16.080
  • West Virginia Statute of Limitations - 2 years Title 55, Ch. 2, Sec. 55-2-12
  • Wisconsin Statute of Limitations - 3 years Chapter 893, Sec. 893.54
  • Wyoming Statute of Limitations - 4 years Title 1, Ch. 3, Sec. 1-3-105

Note: When referring to the states listed above, look to the state where your injury occurred, rather than the state where you live.

Should I Contact a Personal Injury Attorney?

You should talk to a personal injury attorney to make sure that you understand the statute of limitations that applies to your individual situation. If you have a strong legal claim, your attorney will help you file a claim and will represent you in court.

Photo of page author Kourosh Akhbari

, LegalMatch Legal Writer

Last Modified: 07-14-2017 01:13 PM PDT

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