Child Support Law in Georgia

Child support requirements and regulations can vary from state to state. If the child moves from one state to another, the requirements for child support may change. While the states may have similar child support laws, it is important to know their variations to make sure that you do not face penalties.

– See more at: //www.legalmatch.com/law-library/article/georgia-child-support-lawyers.html#sthash.YjjMA1pl.dpuf

Child Support Law in Georgia

Child support requirements and regulations can vary from state to state. If the child moves from one state to another, the requirements for child support may change. While the states may have similar child support laws, it is important to know their variations to make sure that you do not face penalties.

– See more at: //www.legalmatch.com/law-library/article/georgia-child-support-lawyers.html#sthash.YjjMA1pl.dpuf

Child Support Law in Georgia

Child support requirements and regulations can vary from state to state. If the child moves from one state to another, the requirements for child support may change. While the states may have similar child support laws, it is important to know their variations to make sure that you do not face penalties.

– See more at: //www.legalmatch.com/law-library/article/georgia-child-support-lawyers.html#sthash.YjjMA1pl.dpufChild

Child Support Law in Georgia

Child support requirements and regulations can vary from state to state. If the child moves from one state to another, the requirements for child support may change. While the states may have similar child support laws, it is important to know their variations to make sure that you do not face penalties.

– See more at: //www.legalmatch.com/law-library/article/georgia-child-support-lawyers.html#sthash.YjjMA1pl.dpuf

Child Support Law in Georgia

Child support requirements and regulations can vary from state to state. If the child moves from one state to another, the requirements for child support may change. While the states may have similar child support laws, it is important to know their variations to make sure that you do not face penalties.

– See more at: //www.legalmatch.com/law-library/article/georgia-child-support-lawyers.html#sthash.YjjMA1pl.dpuf

Child support requirements and regulations can vary from state to state. If the child moves from one state to another, the requirements for child support may change. While the states may have similar child support laws, it is important to know their variations to make sure that you do not face penalties.

Who Needs to Pay Child Support?

Child support is a monthly payment that one or both parents of a child pay to help with the cost of raising the child. In Missouri, the parent that spends less time with the child, known as the non-custodial parent, is required to pay child support. The custodial parent spends more time with the child and is the recipient of child support payments. A court can order either or both parents make child support payments, even if they share joint custody.

How Do You Petition for Child Support?

To apply for child support, you must submit an application online or in print and mail the application to the Missouri Child Support office. The Family Support Division (“FSD”) is a department within the Child Support Office that handles child support enforcement. The child support application requires both the custodial and non-custodial parent to include his or her name, address, phone number, social security number, race, and gender. You must also include your child’s social security number, name, date of birth, county and state of birth, race and gender. 

The application also includes special information relating only to the non-custodial parent, such as his or her occupational and social information (whether the parent is employed, is currently enrolled in school, attended high school and college, whether the parent is a part of the union, and past employment information). Health insurance information must also be disclosed for both the custodial and non-custodial parent. 

Once the application is accepted, child support may be ordered by the courts or by the FSD. The order specifies how often and how much a parent is to pay for child support.

What If You Don’t Pay Child Support?

The FSD and family courts can use the following tools to collect payment from parents with overdue child support accounts:

  • Withhold income from sources such as wages, salaries, bonuses, and unemployment and worker’s compensation benefits of the parent owing child support and applying it to the current and past-due child support;
  • Intercept the paying parent’s state and federal tax returns and lottery winnings and apply them to child support account;
  • Suspend the paying parent’s driver’s license, recreational licenses, and professional or occupational licenses;
  • Hold the paying parent in contempt, requiring the parent to go to court and “show cause” (or explain to the judge) why support hasn’t been paid on time, which can result in jail time or a judgment that damages the paying parent’s credit score; and,
  • Refer the case for criminal prosecution.

What Recourse Can the Other Parent Have if You Don’t Pay for Support?

If one parent does not pay child support, the FSD can help the custodial parent petition to enforce a child support order. However, the FSD is limited and represents the interest of the child first and foremost. Further, they can be slow to act.

You can also file suit against the paying parent. Family court judges can issue orders to help enforce and collect child support. Hiring an attorney can be the quickest way to enforce past due child support payments instead of waiting for FSD to help you enforce overdue support.

How Can You Stop Paying Child Support?

Child support terminates when the child:

  • Dies;
  • Marries;
  • Enters active duty in the military;
  • Becomes self-supporting;
  • Reaches 18, unless the child is physical or mentally incapacitated, or the child is attending a secondary school program; or,
  • Reaches 21, unless the order extends support past the child’s 21st birthday due to physical or mental incapacity.

Where Can You Find the Right Lawyer?

If you need help with petitioning for child support, modifying an existing order, or just to better understand your rights as a parent, then contact a Missouri child support lawyer today to better understand your situation and get help.