Why Are Cuban Cigars Illegal?

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Why Are Cuban Cigars Illegal?

Importation of Cuban cigars into the United States is illegal due to various trade policies and import requirements that are enforced by the U.S. government. This has actually served to create a sort of “demand” for the products, as Cuban cigars can be rare and difficult to obtain.

While it is generally illegal to import a Cuban cigar into the U.S., there are some exceptions to the rules. “Licensed” persons can bring cigars back from Cuba if they are returning directly from the country. Such persons include journalists, athletes, politicians, researchers, members of certain religious groups, and Cuban-Americans.

In addition, the cigars cannot be sold; they must be for personal use and can’t exceed $100 in value. 

What Are the Penalties for Cuban Cigar Violations?

Penalties for Cuban cigar violations can lead to consequences that are similar to or more serious than those for possession of paraphernalia charges. For instance, the person may face fines (sometimes up to $50,000), and possible criminal charges. Violations can include anything from illegal importation, sale, resale, trading, or distribution of Cuban cigars.

Do I Need a Lawyer for Help with Cigar Violations?

Violating a Cuban cigar law can lead to severe penalties. You may wish to hire a criminal lawyer if you’re facing charges and need legal representation. Your attorney can represent you in court and can provide you with legal advice on the matters. Also, your lawyer can provide you with advice if you are planning a trip to Cuba and have questions about Cuban cigars.

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Last Modified: 01-15-2014 12:28 PM PST

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